Facebook Showcase Video Ads

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing
Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the
leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media
Marketing Talk Show, we explore Facebook Showcase video ads and fan
subscriptions with special guests Andrea Vahl and Owen Video. Watch
the

The post Facebook
Showcase Video Ads
appeared first on Social Media Marketing |
Social Media Examiner
.

https://ift.tt/2BZjNJY

Rewriting the Beginner’s Guide to SEO, Chapter 7: Measuring, Prioritizing, & Executing SEO

Posted by BritneyMuller

It’s finally here, for your review and feedback: Chapter 7 of
the new Beginner’s Guide to SEO, the last chapter. We cap off the
guide with advice on how to measure, prioritize, and execute on
your SEO. And if you missed them, check out the drafts of our
outline,
Chapter
One
, Chapter
Two
, Chapter
Three
, Chapter
Four
Chapter
Five
, and Chapter
Six
for your reading pleasure. As always, let us know what you
think of Chapter 7 in
the comments
!

Set yourself up for success.

They say if you can measure something, you can improve it.

In SEO, it’s no different. Professional SEOs track everything
from rankings and conversions to lost links and more to help prove
the value of SEO. Measuring the impact of your work and ongoing
refinement is critical to your SEO success, client retention, and
perceived value.

It also helps you pivot your priorities when something isn’t
working.

Start with the end in mind

While it’s common to have multiple goals (both macro and
micro), establishing one specific primary end goal is
essential.

The only way to know what a website’s primary end goal should
be is to have a strong understanding of the website’s goals
and/or client needs. Good
client questions
are not only helpful in strategically
directing your efforts, but they also show that you care.

Client question examples:

  1. Can you give us a brief history of your company?
  2. What is the monetary value of a newly qualified lead?
  3. What are your most profitable services/products (in
    order)?

Keep the following tips in mind while establishing a website’s
primary goal, additional goals, and benchmarks:

Goal setting tips

  • Measurable: If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve
    it.
  • Be specific: Don’t let vague industry marketing jargon water
    down your goals.
  • Share your goals:
    Studies have shown
    that writing down and sharing your goals
    with others boosts your chances of achieving them.

Measuring

Now that you’ve set your primary goal, evaluate which
additional metrics could help support your site in reaching its end
goal. Measuring additional (applicable) benchmarks can help you
keep a better pulse on current site health and progress.

Engagement metrics

How are people behaving once they reach your site? That’s the
question that engagement metrics seek to answer. Some of the most
popular metrics for measuring how people engage with your content
include:

Conversion rate – The number of conversions (for a single
desired action/goal) divided by the number of unique visits. A
conversion rate can be applied to anything, from an email signup to
a purchase to account creation. Knowing your conversion rate can
help you gauge the return on investment (ROI) your website traffic
might deliver.

In Google Analytics, you can set up
goals
to measure how well your site accomplishes its
objectives. If your objective for a page is a form fill, you can
set that up as a goal. When site visitors accomplish the task,
you’ll be able to see it in your reports.

Time on page – How long did people spend on your page? If you
have a 2,000-word blog post that visitors are only spending an
average of 10 seconds on, the chances are slim that this content is
being consumed (unless they’re a mega-speed reader). However, if
a URL has a low time on page, that’s not necessarily bad either.
Consider the intent of the page. For example, it’s normal for
“Contact Us” pages to have a low average time on page.

Pages per visit – Was the goal of your page to keep readers
engaged and take them to a next step? If so, then pages per visit
can be a valuable engagement metric. If the goal of your page is
independent of other pages on your site (ex: visitor came, got what
they needed, then left), then low pages per visit are okay.

Bounce rate – “Bounced” sessions indicate that a searcher
visited the page and left without browsing your site any further.
Many people try to lower this metric because they believe it’s
tied to website quality, but it actually tells us very little about
a user’s experience. We’ve seen cases of bounce rate spiking
for redesigned restaurant websites that are doing better than ever.
Further investigation discovered that people were simply coming to
find business hours, menus, or an address, then bouncing with the
intention of visiting the restaurant in person. A better metric to
gauge page/site quality is scroll depth.

Scroll depth – This measures how far visitors scroll down
individual webpages. Are visitors reaching your important content?
If not, test different ways of providing the most important content
higher up on your page, such as multimedia, contact forms, and so
on. Also consider the quality of your content. Are you omitting
needless words? Is it enticing for the visitor to continue down the
page? Scroll depth tracking can be set up in your Google
Analytics.

Search traffic

Ranking is a valuable SEO metric, but measuring your site’s
organic performance can’t stop there. The goal of showing up in
search is to be chosen by searchers as the answer to their query.
If you’re ranking but not getting any traffic, you have a
problem.

But how do you even determine how much traffic your site is
getting from search? One of the most precise ways to do this is
with Google Analytics.

Using Google Analytics to uncover traffic insights

Google Analytics (GA) is bursting at the seams with data — so
much so that it can be overwhelming if you don’t know where to
look. This is not an exhaustive list, but rather a general guide to
some of the traffic data you can glean from this free tool.

Isolate organic traffic – GA allows you to view traffic to your
site by channel. This will mitigate any scares caused by changes to
another channel (ex: total traffic dropped because a paid campaign
was halted, but organic traffic remained steady).

Traffic to your site over time – GA allows you to view total
sessions/users/pageviews to your site over a specified date range,
as well as compare two separate ranges.

How many visits a particular page has received – Site Content
reports in GA are great for evaluating the performance of a
particular page — for example, how many unique visitors it
received within a given date range.

Traffic from a specified campaign – You can use UTM (urchin
tracking module) codes for better attribution. Designate
the source, medium, and campaign
, then append the codes to the
end of your URLs. When people start clicking on your UTM-code
links, that data will start to populate in GA’s “campaigns”
report.

Click-through rate (CTR) – Your CTR from search results to a
particular page (meaning the percent of people that clicked your
page from search results) can provide insights on how well you’ve
optimized your page title and meta description. You can find this
data in Google Search Console, a free Google tool.

In addition, Google Tag Manager is a free tool that allows you
to manage and deploy tracking pixels to your website without having
to modify the code. This makes it much easier to track specific
triggers or activity on a website.

Additional common SEO metrics

  • Domain Authority & Page Authority (DA/PA) – Moz’s
    proprietary authority metrics provide powerful insights at a glance
    and are best used as benchmarks relative to your competitors’
    Domain
    Authority
    and Page Authority.
  • Keyword rankings – A website’s ranking position for desired
    keywords. This should also include SERP feature data, like featured
    snippets and People Also Ask boxes that you’re ranking for. Try
    to avoid vanity metrics, such as rankings for competitive keywords
    that are desirable but often too vague and don’t convert as well
    as longer-tail keywords.
  • Number of backlinks – Total number of links pointing to your
    website or the number of unique linking root domains (meaning one
    per unique website, as websites often link out to other websites
    multiple times). While these are both common link metrics, we
    encourage you to look more closely at the quality of backlinks and
    linking root domains your site has.

How to track these metrics

There are lots of different tools available for keeping track of
your site’s position in SERPs, site crawl health, SERP features,
and link metrics, such as Moz Pro and STAT.

The Moz and STAT APIs (among other tools) can also be pulled
into Google Sheets or other customizable dashboard platforms for
clients and quick at-a-glance SEO check-ins. This also allows you
to provide more refined views of only the metrics you care
about.

Dashboard tools like Data Studio, Tableau, and PowerBI can also
help to create interactive data visualizations.

Evaluating a site’s health with an SEO website audit

By having an understanding of certain aspects of your website
— its current position in search, how searchers are interacting
with it, how it’s performing, the quality of its content, its
overall structure, and so on — you’ll be able to better uncover
SEO opportunities. Leveraging the search engines’ own tools can
help surface those opportunities, as well as potential issues:

  • Google
    Search Console
    – If you haven’t already, sign up for a
    free Google Search Console (GSC) account and verify your
    website(s). GSC is full of actionable reports you can use to detect
    website errors, opportunities, and user engagement.
  • Bing Webmaster
    Tools
    – Bing Webmaster Tools has similar functionality to GSC.
    Among other things, it shows you how your site is performing in
    Bing and opportunities for improvement.
  • Lighthouse
    Audit
    – Google’s automated tool for measuring a website’s
    performance, accessibility, progressive web apps, and more. This
    data improves your understanding of how a website is performing.
    Gain specific speed and accessibility insights for a website
    here.
  • PageSpeed
    Insights
    – Provides website performance insights using
    Lighthouse and Chrome User Experience Report data from real user
    measurement (RUM) when available.
  • Structured
    Data Testing Tool
    – Validates that a website is using schema markup (structured data)
    properly.
  • Mobile-Friendly
    Test
    – Evaluates how easily a user can navigate your website on
    a mobile device.
  • Web.dev – Surfaces website
    improvement insights using Lighthouse and provides the ability to
    track progress over time.
  • Tools for
    web devs and SEOs
    – Google often provides new tools for web
    developers and SEOs alike, so keep an eye on any new releases
    here.

While we don’t have room to cover every SEO audit check you
should perform in this guide, we do offer an in-depth Technical SEO
Site Audit course
for more info. When auditing your site, keep
the following in mind:

Crawlability: Are your primary web pages crawlable by search
engines, or are you accidentally blocking Googlebot or Bingbot via
your robots.txt file? Does the website have an accurate sitemap.xml
file in place to help direct crawlers to your primary pages?

Indexed pages: Can your primary pages be found using Google?
Doing a site:yoursite.com OR site:yoursite.com/specific-page check
in Google can help answer this question. If you notice some are
missing, check to make sure a meta robots=noindex tag isn’t
excluding pages that should be indexed and found in search
results.

Check page titles & meta descriptions: Do your titles and
meta descriptions do a good job of summarizing the content of each
page? How are their CTRs in search results, according to Google
Search Console? Are they written in a way that entices searchers to
click your result over the other ranking URLs? Which pages could be
improved? Site-wide crawls are
essential for discovering on-page and technical SEO
opportunities.

Page speed: How does your website perform on mobile devices and
in Lighthouse? Which images could be compressed to improve load
time?

Content quality: How well does the current content of the
website meet the target market’s needs? Is the content 10X better
than other ranking websites’ content? If not, what could you do
better? Think about things like richer content, multimedia, PDFs,
guides, audio content, and more.

Pro tip: Website pruning!

Removing thin, old, low-quality, or rarely visited pages from
your site can help improve your website’s perceived quality.
Performing a content
audit
will help you discover these pruning opportunities. Three
primary ways to prune pages include:

  1. Delete the page (4XX): Use when a page adds no value (ex:
    traffic, links) and/or is outdated.
  2. Redirect (3XX): Redirect the URLs of pages you’re pruning
    when you want to preserve the value they add to your site, such as
    inbound links to that old URL.
  3. NoIndex: Use this when you want the page to remain on your site
    but be removed from the index.

Keyword research and competitive website analysis (performing
audits on your competitors’ websites) can also provide rich
insights on opportunities for your own website.

For example:

  • Which keywords are competitors ranking on page 1 for, but your
    website isn’t?
  • Which keywords is your website ranking on page 1 for that also
    have a featured snippet? You might be able to provide better
    content and take over that snippet.
  • Which websites link to more than one of your competitors, but
    not to your website?

Discovering website content and performance opportunities will
help devise a more data-driven SEO plan of attack! Keep an ongoing
list in order to prioritize your tasks effectively.

Prioritizing your SEO fixes

In order to prioritize SEO fixes effectively, it’s essential
to first have specific, agreed-upon goals established between you
and your client.

While there are a million different ways you could prioritize SEO, we
suggest you rank them in terms of importance and urgency. Which
fixes could provide the most ROI for a website and help support
your agreed-upon goals?

Stephen Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People, developed a handy time management grid that can ease the
burden of prioritization:

Source: Stephen
Covey, The 7 Habits of
Highly Effective People

Putting out small, urgent SEO fires might feel most effective in
the short term, but this often leads to neglecting non-urgent
important fixes. The not urgent & important items are
ultimately what often move the needle for a website’s SEO.
Don’t put these off.

SEO planning
& execution

“Without strategy, execution is aimless. Without
execution, strategy is useless.”
– Morris Chang

Much of your success depends on effectively mapping out and
scheduling your SEO tasks. You can use free tools like Google
Sheets to plan out your SEO execution (we have a
free template here
), but you can use whatever method works best
for you. Some people prefer to schedule out their SEO tasks in
their Google Calendar, in a kanban or scrum board, or in a daily
planner.

Use what works for you and stick to it.

Measuring your progress along the way via the metrics mentioned
above will help you monitor your effectiveness and allow you to
pivot your SEO efforts when something isn’t working. Say, for
example, you changed a primary page’s title and meta description,
only to notice that the CTR for that page decreased. Perhaps you
changed it to something too vague or strayed too far from the
on-page topic — it might be good to try a different approach.
Keeping an eye on drops in rankings, CTRs, organic traffic, and
conversions can help you manage hiccups like this early, before
they become a bigger problem.

Communication is essential for SEO client longevity

Many SEO fixes are implemented without being noticeable to a
client (or user). This is why it’s essential to employ good
communication skills around your SEO plan, the time frame in which
you’re working, and your benchmark metrics, as well as frequent
check-ins and reports.

Sign up for The Moz Top
10
, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest
pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team.
Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time
to hunt down but want to read!

https://ift.tt/2UeXmrh

Rewriting the Beginner’s Guide to SEO, Chapter 7: Measuring, Prioritizing, & Executing SEO

Posted by BritneyMuller

It’s finally here, for your review and feedback: Chapter 7 of
the new Beginner’s Guide to SEO, the last chapter. We cap off the
guide with advice on how to measure, prioritize, and execute on
your SEO. And if you missed them, check out the drafts of our
outline,
Chapter
One
, Chapter
Two
, Chapter
Three
, Chapter
Four
Chapter
Five
, and Chapter
Six
for your reading pleasure. As always, let us know what you
think of Chapter 7 in
the comments
!

Set yourself up for success.

They say if you can measure something, you can improve it.

In SEO, it’s no different. Professional SEOs track everything
from rankings and conversions to lost links and more to help prove
the value of SEO. Measuring the impact of your work and ongoing
refinement is critical to your SEO success, client retention, and
perceived value.

It also helps you pivot your priorities when something isn’t
working.

Start with the end in mind

While it’s common to have multiple goals (both macro and
micro), establishing one specific primary end goal is
essential.

The only way to know what a website’s primary end goal should
be is to have a strong understanding of the website’s goals
and/or client needs. Good
client questions
are not only helpful in strategically
directing your efforts, but they also show that you care.

Client question examples:

  1. Can you give us a brief history of your company?
  2. What is the monetary value of a newly qualified lead?
  3. What are your most profitable services/products (in
    order)?

Keep the following tips in mind while establishing a website’s
primary goal, additional goals, and benchmarks:

Goal setting tips

  • Measurable: If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve
    it.
  • Be specific: Don’t let vague industry marketing jargon water
    down your goals.
  • Share your goals:
    Studies have shown
    that writing down and sharing your goals
    with others boosts your chances of achieving them.

Measuring

Now that you’ve set your primary goal, evaluate which
additional metrics could help support your site in reaching its end
goal. Measuring additional (applicable) benchmarks can help you
keep a better pulse on current site health and progress.

Engagement metrics

How are people behaving once they reach your site? That’s the
question that engagement metrics seek to answer. Some of the most
popular metrics for measuring how people engage with your content
include:

Conversion rate – The number of conversions (for a single
desired action/goal) divided by the number of unique visits. A
conversion rate can be applied to anything, from an email signup to
a purchase to account creation. Knowing your conversion rate can
help you gauge the return on investment (ROI) your website traffic
might deliver.

In Google Analytics, you can set up
goals
to measure how well your site accomplishes its
objectives. If your objective for a page is a form fill, you can
set that up as a goal. When site visitors accomplish the task,
you’ll be able to see it in your reports.

Time on page – How long did people spend on your page? If you
have a 2,000-word blog post that visitors are only spending an
average of 10 seconds on, the chances are slim that this content is
being consumed (unless they’re a mega-speed reader). However, if
a URL has a low time on page, that’s not necessarily bad either.
Consider the intent of the page. For example, it’s normal for
“Contact Us” pages to have a low average time on page.

Pages per visit – Was the goal of your page to keep readers
engaged and take them to a next step? If so, then pages per visit
can be a valuable engagement metric. If the goal of your page is
independent of other pages on your site (ex: visitor came, got what
they needed, then left), then low pages per visit are okay.

Bounce rate – “Bounced” sessions indicate that a searcher
visited the page and left without browsing your site any further.
Many people try to lower this metric because they believe it’s
tied to website quality, but it actually tells us very little about
a user’s experience. We’ve seen cases of bounce rate spiking
for redesigned restaurant websites that are doing better than ever.
Further investigation discovered that people were simply coming to
find business hours, menus, or an address, then bouncing with the
intention of visiting the restaurant in person. A better metric to
gauge page/site quality is scroll depth.

Scroll depth – This measures how far visitors scroll down
individual webpages. Are visitors reaching your important content?
If not, test different ways of providing the most important content
higher up on your page, such as multimedia, contact forms, and so
on. Also consider the quality of your content. Are you omitting
needless words? Is it enticing for the visitor to continue down the
page? Scroll depth tracking can be set up in your Google
Analytics.

Search traffic

Ranking is a valuable SEO metric, but measuring your site’s
organic performance can’t stop there. The goal of showing up in
search is to be chosen by searchers as the answer to their query.
If you’re ranking but not getting any traffic, you have a
problem.

But how do you even determine how much traffic your site is
getting from search? One of the most precise ways to do this is
with Google Analytics.

Using Google Analytics to uncover traffic insights

Google Analytics (GA) is bursting at the seams with data — so
much so that it can be overwhelming if you don’t know where to
look. This is not an exhaustive list, but rather a general guide to
some of the traffic data you can glean from this free tool.

Isolate organic traffic – GA allows you to view traffic to your
site by channel. This will mitigate any scares caused by changes to
another channel (ex: total traffic dropped because a paid campaign
was halted, but organic traffic remained steady).

Traffic to your site over time – GA allows you to view total
sessions/users/pageviews to your site over a specified date range,
as well as compare two separate ranges.

How many visits a particular page has received – Site Content
reports in GA are great for evaluating the performance of a
particular page — for example, how many unique visitors it
received within a given date range.

Traffic from a specified campaign – You can use UTM (urchin
tracking module) codes for better attribution. Designate
the source, medium, and campaign
, then append the codes to the
end of your URLs. When people start clicking on your UTM-code
links, that data will start to populate in GA’s “campaigns”
report.

Click-through rate (CTR) – Your CTR from search results to a
particular page (meaning the percent of people that clicked your
page from search results) can provide insights on how well you’ve
optimized your page title and meta description. You can find this
data in Google Search Console, a free Google tool.

In addition, Google Tag Manager is a free tool that allows you
to manage and deploy tracking pixels to your website without having
to modify the code. This makes it much easier to track specific
triggers or activity on a website.

Additional common SEO metrics

  • Domain Authority & Page Authority (DA/PA) – Moz’s
    proprietary authority metrics provide powerful insights at a glance
    and are best used as benchmarks relative to your competitors’
    Domain
    Authority
    and Page Authority.
  • Keyword rankings – A website’s ranking position for desired
    keywords. This should also include SERP feature data, like featured
    snippets and People Also Ask boxes that you’re ranking for. Try
    to avoid vanity metrics, such as rankings for competitive keywords
    that are desirable but often too vague and don’t convert as well
    as longer-tail keywords.
  • Number of backlinks – Total number of links pointing to your
    website or the number of unique linking root domains (meaning one
    per unique website, as websites often link out to other websites
    multiple times). While these are both common link metrics, we
    encourage you to look more closely at the quality of backlinks and
    linking root domains your site has.

How to track these metrics

There are lots of different tools available for keeping track of
your site’s position in SERPs, site crawl health, SERP features,
and link metrics, such as Moz Pro and STAT.

The Moz and STAT APIs (among other tools) can also be pulled
into Google Sheets or other customizable dashboard platforms for
clients and quick at-a-glance SEO check-ins. This also allows you
to provide more refined views of only the metrics you care
about.

Dashboard tools like Data Studio, Tableau, and PowerBI can also
help to create interactive data visualizations.

Evaluating a site’s health with an SEO website audit

By having an understanding of certain aspects of your website
— its current position in search, how searchers are interacting
with it, how it’s performing, the quality of its content, its
overall structure, and so on — you’ll be able to better uncover
SEO opportunities. Leveraging the search engines’ own tools can
help surface those opportunities, as well as potential issues:

  • Google
    Search Console
    – If you haven’t already, sign up for a
    free Google Search Console (GSC) account and verify your
    website(s). GSC is full of actionable reports you can use to detect
    website errors, opportunities, and user engagement.
  • Bing Webmaster
    Tools
    – Bing Webmaster Tools has similar functionality to GSC.
    Among other things, it shows you how your site is performing in
    Bing and opportunities for improvement.
  • Lighthouse
    Audit
    – Google’s automated tool for measuring a website’s
    performance, accessibility, progressive web apps, and more. This
    data improves your understanding of how a website is performing.
    Gain specific speed and accessibility insights for a website
    here.
  • PageSpeed
    Insights
    – Provides website performance insights using
    Lighthouse and Chrome User Experience Report data from real user
    measurement (RUM) when available.
  • Structured
    Data Testing Tool
    – Validates that a website is using schema markup (structured data)
    properly.
  • Mobile-Friendly
    Test
    – Evaluates how easily a user can navigate your website on
    a mobile device.
  • Web.dev – Surfaces website
    improvement insights using Lighthouse and provides the ability to
    track progress over time.
  • Tools for
    web devs and SEOs
    – Google often provides new tools for web
    developers and SEOs alike, so keep an eye on any new releases
    here.

While we don’t have room to cover every SEO audit check you
should perform in this guide, we do offer an in-depth Technical SEO
Site Audit course
for more info. When auditing your site, keep
the following in mind:

Crawlability: Are your primary web pages crawlable by search
engines, or are you accidentally blocking Googlebot or Bingbot via
your robots.txt file? Does the website have an accurate sitemap.xml
file in place to help direct crawlers to your primary pages?

Indexed pages: Can your primary pages be found using Google?
Doing a site:yoursite.com OR site:yoursite.com/specific-page check
in Google can help answer this question. If you notice some are
missing, check to make sure a meta robots=noindex tag isn’t
excluding pages that should be indexed and found in search
results.

Check page titles & meta descriptions: Do your titles and
meta descriptions do a good job of summarizing the content of each
page? How are their CTRs in search results, according to Google
Search Console? Are they written in a way that entices searchers to
click your result over the other ranking URLs? Which pages could be
improved? Site-wide crawls are
essential for discovering on-page and technical SEO
opportunities.

Page speed: How does your website perform on mobile devices and
in Lighthouse? Which images could be compressed to improve load
time?

Content quality: How well does the current content of the
website meet the target market’s needs? Is the content 10X better
than other ranking websites’ content? If not, what could you do
better? Think about things like richer content, multimedia, PDFs,
guides, audio content, and more.

Pro tip: Website pruning!

Removing thin, old, low-quality, or rarely visited pages from
your site can help improve your website’s perceived quality.
Performing a content
audit
will help you discover these pruning opportunities. Three
primary ways to prune pages include:

  1. Delete the page (4XX): Use when a page adds no value (ex:
    traffic, links) and/or is outdated.
  2. Redirect (3XX): Redirect the URLs of pages you’re pruning
    when you want to preserve the value they add to your site, such as
    inbound links to that old URL.
  3. NoIndex: Use this when you want the page to remain on your site
    but be removed from the index.

Keyword research and competitive website analysis (performing
audits on your competitors’ websites) can also provide rich
insights on opportunities for your own website.

For example:

  • Which keywords are competitors ranking on page 1 for, but your
    website isn’t?
  • Which keywords is your website ranking on page 1 for that also
    have a featured snippet? You might be able to provide better
    content and take over that snippet.
  • Which websites link to more than one of your competitors, but
    not to your website?

Discovering website content and performance opportunities will
help devise a more data-driven SEO plan of attack! Keep an ongoing
list in order to prioritize your tasks effectively.

Prioritizing your SEO fixes

In order to prioritize SEO fixes effectively, it’s essential
to first have specific, agreed-upon goals established between you
and your client.

While there are a million different ways you could prioritize SEO, we
suggest you rank them in terms of importance and urgency. Which
fixes could provide the most ROI for a website and help support
your agreed-upon goals?

Stephen Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People, developed a handy time management grid that can ease the
burden of prioritization:

Source: Stephen
Covey, The 7 Habits of
Highly Effective People

Putting out small, urgent SEO fires might feel most effective in
the short term, but this often leads to neglecting non-urgent
important fixes. The not urgent & important items are
ultimately what often move the needle for a website’s SEO.
Don’t put these off.

SEO planning
& execution

“Without strategy, execution is aimless. Without
execution, strategy is useless.”
– Morris Chang

Much of your success depends on effectively mapping out and
scheduling your SEO tasks. You can use free tools like Google
Sheets to plan out your SEO execution (we have a
free template here
), but you can use whatever method works best
for you. Some people prefer to schedule out their SEO tasks in
their Google Calendar, in a kanban or scrum board, or in a daily
planner.

Use what works for you and stick to it.

Measuring your progress along the way via the metrics mentioned
above will help you monitor your effectiveness and allow you to
pivot your SEO efforts when something isn’t working. Say, for
example, you changed a primary page’s title and meta description,
only to notice that the CTR for that page decreased. Perhaps you
changed it to something too vague or strayed too far from the
on-page topic — it might be good to try a different approach.
Keeping an eye on drops in rankings, CTRs, organic traffic, and
conversions can help you manage hiccups like this early, before
they become a bigger problem.

Communication is essential for SEO client longevity

Many SEO fixes are implemented without being noticeable to a
client (or user). This is why it’s essential to employ good
communication skills around your SEO plan, the time frame in which
you’re working, and your benchmark metrics, as well as frequent
check-ins and reports.

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Meet 4 Female CMOs Paving The Way For The Future of Marketing

Meet 4 CMOs Paving the Way for the Future of Marketing

The modern CMO must be both right- and left-brained. It’s not
enough to be creative — you have to be analytical, too. Man or
woman—it doesn’t matter: the CMO of the digital world has to be
good at everything. Ground-breaking campaigns only matter if they
yield a positive ROI.

Here are four women who show how a strong CMO fuses the creative
with the analytical to produce exceptional results for their
brands.

Alicia Hatch, Deloitte1. Deloitte Digital, Alicia
Hatch

Alicia Hatch leads Deloitte Digital’s marketing efforts and
has spearheaded the billion-dollar Halo franchise’s marketing
efforts.

At Deloitte Digital, however, she’s more than just a creative
thinker—she has positioned Deloitte Digital to disrupt the
advertising world. In Hatch’s words: “We’re making creativity
more important than ever by tying it more closely to the heart of
business strategy and industry insights.”

Hatch has launched numerous initiatives across Deloitte’s
content and commerce systems as well. She was a huge part of John
Hancock’s decision to switch over to Deloitte from Hill Holiday.
When Transamerica came to Deloitte to reinvent their retirement
offerings, Hatch was at the forefront. Her innovative strategy
brought in an eclectic team, ranging from ethnographers to data
scientists, to provide a dynamic and holistic approach.

Alicia gives the following advice for paving the future: “if
you become comfortable with that gray area—the space where you
know you don’t know the answer—you only have a tremendous
opportunity in front of you.”

Robin Matlock, VMWare2. VMware, Robin Matlock

Robin Matlock sits at the marketing helm of VMware. Her vision
is a results-driven one. “We have to facilitate a conversation
that is anchored around business outcomes,” she says.
”Everything we do as marketers … is to help sellers start those
conversations.”

Robin’s strategy for transformation is rooted in data. She is
making a major impact by tracking engagement to improve customer
experience. One of the major insights she gained from this is that
leads that are touched by VMware’s marketing efforts convert at
double the rate as leads only touched by sales.

In addition, she specializes in running a highly data-driven
global marketing team. What does engagement mean for vertical
markets? Who are the target personas? What actions are they
taking?

It’s not enough to say if someone from Firm X watched an
educational video, Matlock needs to know how they watched it. Did
they sit through it from start to finish? Did they skip around? Did
they promote it via social media? To really transform a pipeline,
Matlock believes you need to get granular to get accurate.

Leslie Berland, Twitter3. Twitter, Leslie Berland

Leslie Berland is not only the CMO of one of the world’s tech
darlings, but she’s also its first CMO. Hired in 2016, she
pioneered Twitter’s self-awareness campaign, an issue it hadn’t
addressed in its first decade as a business.

She started the famous #SeeEverySide campaign, showcasing the
multitude of ideas and perspectives across the Twitterverse. This
was more than just a promotional effort — it was essential to the
inner-workings at Twitter.

Fired up and ready to throw ⛽🔥thanks to @leslieberland

#SheInspiresMe

#BossBabe

#SeeEverySide
🙏🏼🙌🏽👠pic.twitter.com/LGV0cepoE3

— Erin (Twomey) Turner (@erinleeturner)
August 3, 2017

Berland spoke on this: “That was very anchoring and grounding
for us as a company. And it is where our product strategy is
focused—showing what’s happening, what matters, news and
information as it unfolds.”

Perhaps the most iconic part of this campaign was when they
posted the single word “The” to their page and allowed users to
run with it from there.

Among her many skills, she has an uncanny ability to focus on
both the inner- and outer-facing operations at Twitter—so much so
that she is now the acting head of HR. Her title “CMO and Head of
People” is not only a clever variation on the archaic “human
resources” — it’s part of her strategy to build a better
enterprise.

Joanne Bradford, SoFi4. SoFi, Joanne Bradford

It’s tough referring to SoFi as “startup” after 2015 when
it raised a cool billion in funds and recruited veteran marketing
executive Joanne Bradford.

Bradford, who served Microsoft, Yahoo, and Pinterest, among
others, is another of the rare right brain/left-brain CMOs on this
list. For starters, prior to serving as CMO, she was their
COO—which is a testament to her analytical and leadership
skills.

Her talents were critical in scaling and growth, where she has
been instrumental in securing new partnerships and growing their
member base. Engagement and leveraging Member Success programs were
her bread and butter in these efforts, and the results are
staggering. In her time with SoFi, the company has exceeded half a
million members.

Perhaps the most iconic story about Bradford was locking down
the first
overtime Super Bowl ad ever
. Understanding the value of
awareness, she created the ad on a shoestring budget of $10,000 and
filmed it in under a week. Due to her efforts, SoFi’s brand
awareness has grown more than 10-fold in just three years.

A Dynamic Future for Marketing

Competition in the marketing space is fiercer than ever as the
field becomes more sophisticated and analytical. That’s not to
discount creativity, however—it’s as essential as ever before.
But in the 21st century, creativity has to be fueled by data (and
vice versa) in order to create the perfect storm for business
growth and development.

This mantra is well understood by these four women, who are
paving the way for the future of marketing. The smart marketer will
make sure to follow their lead, coupling left- and right-brain
innovation to deliver dynamic, powerful results for their
brands.

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Affordable, Stat-Based Retail Strategy For Your Agency’s Clients

Posted by MiriamEllis

Retail clients are battling tough economics offline and tough
competitors online. They need every bit of help your agency can
give them. 

I was heartened when 75 percent of the 1,400+ respondents to the
Moz
State of Local SEO Industry Report 2019
shared that they
contribute to offline strategy recommendations either frequently or
at least some of the time. I can’t think of a market where good
and relatively inexpensive experiments are more needed than in
embattled retail. The ripple effect of a single new idea, offered
up generously, can spread out to encompass new revenue streams for
the client and new levels of retention for your agency.

And that’s why win-win seemed written all over three
statistics from a
2018 Yes Marketing retail survey
when I read it because they
speak to motivating about one quarter to half of 1,000 polled
customers without going to any extreme expense. Take a look:

I highly recommend downloading Yes Marketing’s
complete survey
which is chock-full of great data, but today,
let’s look at just three valuable stats from it to come up with
an actionable strategy you can gift your offline retail clients at
your next meeting.

Getting it right: A little market near me

For the past 16 years, I’ve been observing the local business
scene with a combination of professional scrutiny and personal
regard. I’m inspired by businesses that open and thrive and am
saddened by those that open and close.

Right now, I’m especially intrigued by a very small,
independently-owned grocery store which set up shop last year in
what I’ll lovingly describe as a rural, half-a-horse town not far
from me. This locale has a single main street with less than 20
businesses on it, but I’m predicting the shop’s ultimate
success based on several factors. A strong one is that the
community is flanked by several much larger towns with lots of
through traffic and the market is several miles from any
competitor. But other factors which match point-for-point with the
data in the Yes Marketing survey make me feel especially confident
that this small business is going to “get it right”. 

Encourage your retail clients to explore the following tips.

1) The store is visually appealing

43–58 percent of Yes Marketing’s surveyed retail customers
say they’d be motivated to shop with a retailer who has cool
product displays, murals, etc. Retail shoppers of all ages are
seeking appealing experiences.

At the market near me, there are many things going on in its
favor. The building is historic on the outside and full of natural
light on this inside, and the staff sets up creative displays, such
as all of the ingredients you need to make a hearty winter soup
gathered up on a vintage table. The
Instagram crowd can have selfie fun here
, and more mature
customers will appreciate the aesthetic simplicity of this
uncluttered, human-scale shopping experience.

For your retail clients, it won’t break the bank to become
more visually appealing. Design cues are everywhere!

Share these suggestions with a worthy client:

Basic cleanliness is the starting point

This is an
old survey
, but I think we’re safe to say that at least 45
percent of retail customers are still put off by dirty premises —
especially restrooms. Janitorial duties are already built into the
budget of most businesses and only need to be accomplished
properly. I continuously notice how many reviewers proclaim the
word “clean” when a business deserves it.

Inspiration is affordable

Whatever employees are already being paid is the cost of
engaging them to lend their creativity to creating merchandise
displays that draw attention and/or solve problems. My hearty
winter soup example is one idea (complete with boxed broth, pasta,
veggies, bowls, and cookware). 

For your retail client? It might be everything a consumer needs
to recover from a cold (medicine, citrus fruit, electric blanket,
herbal tea, tissue, a paperback, a sympathetic stuffed animal,
etc.). Or everything one needs to winterize a car, take a trip to a
beach, build a beautiful window box, or pamper a pet. Retailers can
inexpensively encourage the hidden artistic talents in staff.

Feeling stuck? The Internet is full of
free retail display tips
, design
magazines cost a few bucks
, and your clients’ cable bills
already cover a subscription to channels like HGTV and the DIY
network that trade on style. A client who knows that interior
designers are all using
grey-and-white palettes
and that one TV ad after another
features women wearing denim blue with aspen yellow right now is
well on their way to catching customers’ eyes.

Aspiring artists live near your client and need work

The national average cost
to have a large wall mural professionally painted is about
$8,000
, with much less expensive options available. Some
retailers even hold
contests surrounding logo design
, and an artist near your
client may work quite inexpensively if they are trying to build up
their portfolio. I can’t predict how long the
Instagram mural trend
will last, but wall art has been a
crowd-pleaser since
Paleolithic times
. Any shopper who stops to snap a photo of
themselves has been brought in close proximity to your front
door.

I pulled this word cloud out of the reviews of the little
grocery store:

While your clients’ industries and aesthetics will vary, tell
them they can aim for a similar, positive response from at least 49
percent of their customers with a little more care put into the
shopping environment.

2) The store offers additional services beyond the sale of products

19–40 percent of survey respondents are influenced by
value-adds. Doubtless, you’ve seen the TV commercials in which
banks double as coffee houses to appeal to the young, and small
hardware chains emphasize staff expertise over loneliness in a
warehouse. That’s what this is all about, and it can be done at a
smaller scale, without overly-strapping your retail
clients.

At the market near me, reviews like this are coming in:

The market has worked out a very economic arrangement with a
massage therapist, who can build up their clientele out of the
deal, so it’s a win for everybody.

For your retail clients, sharing these examples could inspire
appealing added services:

The cost of these efforts is either the salary of an employee,
nominal or free.

3) The store hosts local events

20–36 percent of customers feel the appeal of retailers
becoming destinations for things to learn and do. Coincidentally,
this corresponds with two of the tasks Google
dubbed micro-moments
a couple of years back, and while not
everyone loves that terminology, we can at least agree that large
numbers of people use the Internet to discover local resources.

At the market near me, they’re doing open-mic readings, and
this is a trend in many cities to which Google Calendar
attests:

For your clients, the last two words of that event description
are key. When there’s a local wish to build community, retail
businesses can lend the space and the stage. This can look
like:

Again, costs here can be quite modest and you’ll be bringing
the community together under the banner of your business.

Putting it in writing

The last item on the budget for any of these ventures is
whatever it costs to publicize it. For sure, your client will
want:

  • A homepage announcement and/or one or more blog posts
  • Google Posts, Q&A, photos and related features
  • Social mentions
  • If the concept is large enough (or the community is small) some
    outreach to local news in hopes of a write-up and inclusion of
    local/social calendars
  • Link building would be great if the client can afford a
    reasonable investment in your services, where necessary
  • And, of course, be sure your client’s local business listings
    are accurate
    so that newcomers aren’t getting lost on their
    way to finding the cool new offering

Getting the word out about events, features, and other desirable
attributes don’t have to be exorbitant, but it will put the
finishing touch on ensuring a community knows the business is ready
to offer the desired experience.

Seeing opportunity

Sometimes, you’ll find yourself in a client meeting and things
will be a bit flat. Maybe the client has been disengaged from your
contract lately, or sales have been leveling out for lack of new
ideas. That’s the perfect time to put something fresh on the
table, demonstrating that you’re thinking about the client’s
whole picture beyond CTR and citations.

One thing that I find to be an inspiring practice for agencies
is to do an audit of competitors’ reviews looking for “holes”
In many communities, shopping is really dull and reviews reflect
that, with few shoppers feeling genuinely excited by a particular
vertical’s local offerings. Your client could be the one to
change that, with a little extra attention from you.

Every possibility won’t be the perfect match for every
business, but if you can help the company see a new opportunity,
the few minutes spent brainstorming could benefit you both.

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Why Done is Better Than Perfect is Now a Broken and Unworkable Philosophy

Done is Better than Perfect is Now a Broken Philosophy

Facebook’s mantra for developers has long been “Move
Fast and Break Things
.”

This idea of doing something, even if it’s not ideal was also
adopted by Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, who serves as the tech
Oprah for millions of people. Her version of the slogan is
Done
is Better than Perfect.

In the startup and “personal brand” worlds, the premise of
“just ship it” is dogma so universally embraced that it joins
the “hustle” mantra to form the twin peaks of
self-actualization.

Even acknowledged genius Seth Godin advocated for releasing work
with known flaws. In his book Poke the Box, Godin urged readers to
behave more like computer programmers, shipping
out minimum viable products and improving them in real time
. In
this way, at least when he wrote the book in 2010/2011, Godin was
aligned with the Facebook approach of anything goes, as long as it
goes.

And in those days — just 8 or 9 years but seemingly a lifetime
ago — customers were wandering around in slack-jawed wonderment,
giddy about all the new innovations that improved their lives.

In 2010 alone, Facebook passed Google to become the most-visited
website, making social networking fully mainstream.

The iPad was launched, creating a whole new computing
category.

Foursquare got popular, kicking off the notion of location-based
personalization.

Microsoft Kinect appeared for the Xbox 360, taking the “your
body is the controller” trend up a level after it was created by
Nintendo’s Wii.

The Apple app store took off, ushering in a whole new way to get
software and media.

Netflix became
the #1 app for iPhone
in 2010, making portable streaming viable
for all.

Groupon was
Time Magazine’s #2 iPhone app for 2010
, popularizing the
daily deals business model.

In short, technology and
customer experience
advances were MASSIVE in this period, with
meaningful shifts in consumer computing, connectivity, and
entertainment.

And in this period, a philosophy of “Done is Better
Than Perfect” may have added up. The public was justifiably blown
away by the scope and scale of these advances, so if the Kinect was
a little buggy or the app store was hard to figure out —
whatever. It’s worth fighting the frustration to get access to
something that has a fundamental impact on how you interact with
others or spend time.

Today, however, the scope and scale of the advances are
primarily in the “same but more” and “same, but a little
better” category. Bigger TVs. Faster streaming. Some AR/VR
frosting on the same, old cake. A paradox of choice at every turn.
Even what is billed as “new” isn’t all that “new” these
days.

And for their part, it’s vastly more difficult to shock and
awe consumers today. All the amazing advances of the recent past
have raised the bar again and again and again such that customer
expectations are higher than ever and continue to escalate.

I vividly remember when the Taco Bell restaurant in my town went
to 24-hours-a-day. It was like a magic trick performed with refried
beans and a talking Chihuaha. Now, everything is 24-hours-a-day,
and I couldn’t care less. I expect it now.

When Zappos popularized free, two-way shipping? We throw around
the term “game-changer” with regularity, but that actually
altered the fabric of e-commerce, forever. Today, most online
stores offer free, two-way shipping. They can’t NOT do it,
because consumers expect it.

This is the yoke of customer experience, and why CX optimization
is so hard in companies. CX is one of the only elements of business
where consumer expectations go up and up and up. What was a
remarkable customer experience three years ago is commonplace
today.

Simultaneously, the long-running economic expansion has also
helped shape how and why customers buy. When times are bad, price
becomes the primary criterion. But when times are good, consumers
take other attributes into account when making a decision. And
these days, customer experience is a driving factor in more, and
more, and more purchases.


Research from Walker
suggests that customer experience will be
the deciding factor in a MAJORITY of B2B purchases by next
year.

A
research study from PwC
shows that 75% of Americans say
customer experience is an important factor in their buying
decisions.

Further, consumers will pay up to a 16% price premium for a
great experience.

And, 63% of consumers say they’d provide more, personal data
in exchange for better CX.

In this present-day era, where consumers are making decisions
that are significantly dictated by customer experience, how in the
world do you justify putting a product or service into the
marketplace that is knowingly less than great?

The whole idea of “Done is Better Than Perfect” is that
speed trumps quality. But today, if you make that trade-off, you
are strategically and purposefully sacrificing customer experience
for nimbleness. That may accomplish corporate goals. and may help
you cross some parking lot items off your next 2-week product dev
sprint, but it does NOT serve the customer.

Right now — and at least until the economy turns markedly
worse — customers want it ALL. They want it fast, and they want
it great. To give them something less than your best because
you’ve convinced yourself that okay is adequate as long as
you’re moving fast is counter-cyclical at best, and ritual
business suicide at worst.

The entire wheelbarrow of startup culture thinking that
prioritizes progress over making the customers’ job easier has
merit when consumers are genuinely delighted that your new thing
finally exists (even imperfectly). But those days are long past.
And thus, until further notice, it’s time to put a giant fork in
“Done is Better Than Perfect” and similar claptrap, for they
are well and truly past their prime.

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Why Done is Better Than Perfect is Now a Broken and Unworkable
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The Definitive Guide to Instagram Affiliate Marketing

The Definitive Guide to Instagram Affiliate Marketing

One of the ways in which influencers from all industries are
trying to monetize their social media influence is through
Instagram affiliate marketing. With Instagram becoming so popular
globally and having an active and engaging audience, Instagram
affiliate marketing is one of the top ways in which influencers can
monetize their social media followings – 1…

Read More
»

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Definitive Guide to Instagram Affiliate Marketing
authored by
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8 Costly Facebook Ad Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Are you making Facebook ad mistakes that could be eating away at
your marketing budget? Are your ads helping Facebook more than
they’re helping your business? In this article, you’ll discover
the most common mistakes made with Facebook ads and how to resolve
them from top Facebook advertising experts. #1: Testing Multiple
Interests in a

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14 SEO Predictions for 2019 & Beyond, as Told by Mozzers

Posted by TheMozTeam

With the new year in full swing and an already busy first
quarter, our 2019 predictions for SEO in the new year are hopping
onto the scene a little late — but fashionably so, we hope. From
an explosion of SERP features to increased monetization to the key
drivers of search this year, our SEO experts have consulted their
crystal balls (read: access to mountains of data and in-depth
analyses) and made their predictions. Read on for an exhaustive
list of fourteen things to watch out for in search from our very
own Dr. Pete, Britney Muller, Rob Bucci, Russ Jones, and Miriam
Ellis!

1. Answers will drive search

People Also Ask boxes exploded in 2018, and featured snippets
have expanded into both multifaceted and multi-snippet versions.
Google wants to answer questions, it wants to answer them across as
many devices as possible, and it will reward sites with succinct,
well-structured answers. Focus on answers that naturally leave
visitors wanting more and establish your brand and credibility.
[Dr. Peter J. Meyers]

Further reading:

2. Voice search will continue to be utterly useless for
optimization

Optimizing for voice search will still be no more than
optimizing for featured snippets, and conversions from voice will
remain a dark box. [Russ
Jones
]

Further reading:

3. Mobile is table stakes

This is barely a prediction. If your 2019 plan is to finally
figure out mobile, you’re already too late. Almost all Google
features are designed with mobile-first in mind, and the
mobile-first index has expanded rapidly in the past few months. Get
your mobile house (not to be confused with your mobile home) in
order as soon as you can. [Dr. Peter J. Meyers]

Further reading:

4. Further SERP feature intrusions in organic search

Expect Google to find more and more ways to replace organic with
solutions that keep users on Google’s property. This includes
interactive SERP features that replace, slowly but surely, many
website offerings in the same way that live scores, weather, and
flights have. [Russ
Jones
]

Further reading:

5. Video will dominate niches

Featured Videos, Video Carousels, and Suggested Clips (where
Google targets specific content in a video) are taking over the
how-to spaces. As Google tests search appliances with screens,
including Home Hub, expect video to dominate instructional and DIY
niches. [Dr. Peter J.
Meyers
]

Further reading:

6. SERPs will become more interactive

We’ve seen the start of interactive SERPs with People Also Ask
Boxes. Depending on which question you expand, two to three new
questions will generate below that directly pertain to your
expanded question. This real-time engagement keeps people on the
SERP longer and helps Google better understand what a user is
seeking. [Britney
Muller
]

Further reading:

7. Local SEO: Google will continue getting up in your business —
literally

Google will continue asking more and more intimate questions
about your business to your customers. Does this business have
gender-neutral bathrooms? Is this business accessible? What is the
atmosphere like? How clean is it? What kind of lighting do they
have? And so on. If Google can acquire accurate, real-world
information about your business (your percentage of repeat
customers via geocaching, price via transaction history, etc.) they
can rely less heavily on website signals and provide more accurate
results to searchers. [Britney Muller]

Further reading:

8. Business proximity-to-searcher will remain a top local ranking
factor

In Moz’s recent State of Local SEO report, the majority of
respondents agreed that Google’s focus on the proximity of a
searcher to local businesses frequently emphasizes distance over
quality in the local SERPs. I predict that we’ll continue to see
this heavily weighting the results in 2019. On the one hand,
hyper-localized results can be positive, as they allow a diversity
of businesses to shine for a given search. On the other hand, with
the exception of urgent situations, most people would prefer to see
best options rather than just closest ones. [Miriam Ellis]

Further reading:

9. Local SEO: Google is going to increase monetization

Look to see more of the local and maps space monetized uniquely
by Google both through Adwords and potentially new lead-gen models.
This space will become more and more competitive. [Russ Jones]

Further reading:

10. Monetization tests for voice

Google and Amazon have been moving towards voice-supported
displays in hopes of better monetizing voice. It will be
interesting to see their efforts to get displays in homes and how
they integrate the display advertising. Bold prediction: Amazon
will provide sleep-mode display ads similar to how Kindle currently
displays them today. [Britney Muller]

11. Marketers will place a greater focus on the SERPs

I expect we’ll see a greater focus on the analysis of SERPs as
Google does more to give people answers without them having to
leave the search results. We’re seeing more and more vertical
search engines like Google Jobs, Google Flights, Google Hotels,
Google Shopping. We’re also seeing more in-depth content make it
onto the SERP than ever in the form of featured snippets, People
Also Ask boxes, and more. With these new developments, marketers
are increasingly going to want to report on their general brand
visibility within the SERPs, not just their website ranking. It’s
going to be more important than ever for people to be measuring all
the elements within a SERP, not just their own ranking. [Rob Bucci]

Further reading:

12. Targeting topics will be more productive than targeting queries

2019 is going to be another year in which we see the emphasis on
individual search queries start to decline, as people focus more on
clusters of queries around topics. People Also Ask queries have
made the importance of topics much more obvious to the SEO
industry. With PAAs, Google is clearly illustrating that they think
about searcher experience in terms of a searcher’s satisfaction
across an entire topic, not just a specific search query. With this
in mind, we can expect SEOs to more and more want to see their
search queries clustered into topics so they can measure their
visibility and the competitive landscape across these clusters.
[Rob Bucci]

Further reading:

13. Linked unstructured citations will receive increasing focus

I recently conducted a small study in which there was a 75%
correlation between organic and local pack rank. Linked
unstructured citations (the mention of partial or complete business
information + a link on any type of relevant website) are a means
of improving organic rankings which underpin local rankings. They
can also serve as a non-Google dependent means of driving traffic
and leads. Anything you’re not having to pay Google for will
become increasingly precious. Structured citations on key local
business listing platforms will remain table stakes, but
competitive local businesses will need to focus on unstructured
data to move the needle. [Miriam Ellis]

Further reading:

14. Reviews will remain a competitive difference-maker

A Google rep recently stated that
about one-third of local searches are made with the intent of
reading reviews
. This is huge. Local businesses that acquire
and maintain a good and interactive reputation on the web will have
a critical advantage over brands that ignore reviews as fundamental
to customer service. Competitive local businesses will earn,
monitor, respond to, and analyze the sentiment of their review
corpus. [Miriam
Ellis
]

Further reading:

We’ve heard from Mozzers, and now we want to hear from you.
What have you seen so far in 2019 that’s got your SEO Spidey
senses tingling? What trends are you capitalizing on and planning
for? Let us know in the
comments below
(and brag to friends and colleagues when your
prediction comes true in the next 6–10 months). 😉

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How to Write Instagram Captions That Improve Engagement

Do you want to improve your Instagram post engagement? Wondering
how to write strong Instagram captions that move people to action?
In this article, you’ll discover how to create appealing
Instagram captions that clearly communicate your marketing messages
and encourage people to act. Why Instagram Captions Matter for
Marketers On occasion, you’ll see celebrities or

The post
How to Write Instagram Captions That Improve Engagement

appeared first on Social Media Marketing |
Social Media Examiner
.

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