How to Build a Facebook Ads Funnel by Modeling Email Sequences

Want to scale your most successful email marketing funnels? Wondering how a Facebook ads funnel can help? In this article, you’ll discover how to create a sequence of Facebook and/or Instagram ads based on your email marketing funnel. #1: Outline Your Ad Sequence Funnel Most sales funnels include an email follow-up sequence, which is a

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Facebook Advertising Updates

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Instagram shoppable tags in Stories with Jeff Sieh, Facebook ads updates, Twitter news features with Madalyn Sklar,

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When Bounce Rate, Browse Rate (PPV), and Time-on-Site Are Useful Metrics… and When They Aren’t – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

When is it right to use metrics like bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site? When are you better off ignoring them? There are endless opinions on whether these kinds of metrics are valuable or not, and as you might suspect, the answer is found in the shades of grey. Learn what Rand has to say about the great metrics debate in today’s episode of Whiteboard Friday.

https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/sh1auopisi?seo=false&videoFoam=true

When bounce rate browse rate and ppc are useful metrics and when they suck

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re chatting about times at which bounce rate, browse rate, which is pages per visit, and time on site are terrible metrics and when they’re actually quite useful metrics.

This happens quite a bit. I see in the digital marketing world people talking about these metrics as though they are either dirty-scum, bottom-of-the-barrel metrics that no one should pay any attention to, or that they are these lofty, perfect metrics that are what we should be optimizing for. Neither of those is really accurate. As is often the case, the truth usually lies somewhere in between.

So, first off, some credit to Wil Reynolds, who brought this up during a discussion that I had with him at Siege Media’s offices, an interview that Ross Hudgens put together with us, and Sayf Sharif from Seer Interactive, their Director of Analytics, who left an awesome comment about this discussion on the LinkedIn post of that video. We’ll link to those in this Whiteboard Friday.

So Sayf and Wil were both basically arguing that these are kind of crap metrics. We don’t trust them. We don’t use them a lot. I think, a lot of the time, that makes sense.

Instances when these metrics aren’t useful

Here’s when these metrics, that bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site kind of suck.

1. When they’re used instead of conversion actions to represent “success”

So they suck when you use them instead of conversion actions. So a conversion is someone took an action that I wanted on my website. They filled in a form. They purchased a product. They put in their credit card. Whatever it is, they got to a page that I wanted them to get to.

Bounce rate is basically the average percent of people who landed on a page and then left your website, not to continue on any other page on that site after visiting that page.

Pages per visit is essentially exactly what it sounds like, the average number of pages per visit for people who landed on that particular page. So people who came in through one of these pages, how many pages did they visit on my site.

Then time on site is essentially a very raw and rough metric. If I leave my computer to use the restroom or I basically switch to another tab or close my browser, it’s not necessarily the case that time on site ends right then. So this metric has a lot of imperfections. Now, averaged over time, it can still be directionally interesting.

But when you use these instead of conversion actions, which is what we all should be optimizing for ultimately, you can definitely get into some suckage with these metrics.

2. When they’re compared against non-relevant “competitors” and other sites

When you compare them against non-relevant competitors, so when you compare, for example, a product-focused, purchase-focused site against a media-focused site, you’re going to get big differences. First off, if your pages per visit look like a media site’s pages per visit and you’re product-focused, that is crazy. Either the media site is terrible or you’re doing something absolutely amazing in terms of keeping people’s attention and energy.

Time on site is a little bit misleading in this case too, because if you look at the time on site, again, of a media property or a news-focused, content-focused site versus one that’s very e-commerce focused, you’re going to get vastly different things. Amazon probably wants your time on site to be pretty small. Dell wants your time on site to be pretty small. Get through the purchase process, find the computer you want, buy it, get out of here. If you’re taking 10 minutes to do that or 20 minutes to do that instead of 5, we’ve failed. We haven’t provided a good enough experience to get you quickly through the purchase funnel. That can certainly be the case. So there can be warring priorities inside even one of these metrics.

3. When they’re not considered over time or with traffic sources factored in

Third, you get some suckage when they are not considered over time or against the traffic sources that brought them in. For example, if someone visits a web page via a Twitter link, chances are really good, really, really good, especially on mobile, that they’re going to have a high bounce rate, a low number of pages per visit, and a low time on site. That’s just how Twitter behavior is. Facebook is quite similar.

Now, if they’ve come via a Google search, an informational Google search and they’ve clicked on an organic listing, you should see just the reverse. You should see a relatively good bounce rate. You should see a relatively good pages per visit, well, a relatively higher pages per visit, a relatively higher time on site.

Instances when these metrics are useful1. When they’re used as diagnostics for the conversion funnel

So there’s complexity inside these metrics for sure. What we should be using them for, when these metrics are truly useful is when they are used as a diagnostic. So when you look at a conversion funnel and you see, okay, our conversion funnel looks like this, people come in through the homepage or through our blog or news sections, they eventually, we hope, make it to our product page, our pricing page, and our conversion page.

We have these metrics for all of these. When we make changes to some of these, significant changes, minor changes, we don’t just look at how conversion performs. We also look at whether things like time on site shrank or whether people had fewer pages per visit or whether they had a higher bounce rate from some of these sections.

So perhaps, for example, we changed our pricing and we actually saw that people spent less time on the pricing page and had about the same number of pages per visit and about the same bounce rate from the pricing page. At the same time, we saw conversions dip a little bit.

Should we intuit that pricing negatively affected our conversion rate? Well, perhaps not. Perhaps we should look and see if there were other changes made or if our traffic sources were in there, because it looks like, given that bounce rate didn’t increase, given that pages per visit didn’t really change, given that time on site actually went down a little bit, it seems like people are making it just fine through the pricing page. They’re making it just fine from this pricing page to the conversion page, so let’s look at something else.

This is the type of diagnostics that you can do when you have metrics at these levels. If you’ve seen a dip in conversions or a rise, this is exactly the kind of dig into the data that smart, savvy digital marketers should and can be doing, and I think it’s a powerful, useful tool to be able to form hypotheses based on what happens.

So again, another example, did we change this product page? We saw pages per visit shrink and time on site shrink. Did it affect conversion rate? If it didn’t, but then we see that we’re getting fewer engaged visitors, and so now we can’t do as much retargeting and we’re losing email signups, maybe this did have a negative effect and we should go back to the other one, even if conversion rate itself didn’t seem to take a particular hit in this case.

2. When they’re compared over time to see if internal changes or external forces shifted behavior

Second useful way to apply these metrics is compared over time to see if your internal changes or some external forces shifted behavior. For example, we can look at the engagement rate on the blog. The blog is tough to generate as a conversion event. We could maybe look at subscriptions, but in general, pages per visit is a nice one for the blog. It tells us whether people make it past the page they landed on and into deeper sections, stick around our site, check out what we do.

So if we see that it had a dramatic fall down here in April and that was when we installed a new author and now they’re sort of recovering, we can say, “Oh, yeah, you know what? That takes a little while for a new blog author to kind of come up to speed. We’re going to give them time,” or, “Hey, we should interject here. We need to jump in and try and fix whatever is going on.”

3. When they’re benchmarked versus relevant industry competitors

Third and final useful case is when you benchmark versus truly relevant industry competitors. So if you have a direct competitor, very similar focus to you, product-focused in this case with a homepage and then some content sections and then a very focused product checkout, you could look at you versus them and their homepage and your homepage.

If you could get the data from a source like SimilarWeb or Jumpshot, if there’s enough clickstream level data, or some savvy industry surveys that collect this information, and you see that you’re significantly higher, you might then take a look at what are they doing that we’re not doing. Maybe we should use them when we do our user research and say, “Hey, what’s compelling to you about this that maybe is missing here?”

Otherwise, a lot of the time people will take direct competitors and say, “Hey, let’s look at what our competition is doing and we’ll consider that best practice.” But if you haven’t looked at how they’re performing, how people are getting through, whether they’re engaging, whether they’re spending time on that site, whether they’re making it through their different pages, you don’t know if they actually are best practices or whether you’re about to follow a laggard’s example and potentially hurt yourself.

So definitely a complex topic, definitely many, many different things that go into the uses of these metrics, and there are some bad and good ways to use them. I agree with Sayf and with Wil, but I think there are also some great ways to apply them. I would love to hear from you if you’ve got examples of those down in the comments. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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When Bounce Rate, Browse Rate (PPV), and Time-on-Site Are Useful Metrics… and When They Aren’t – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

When is it right to use metrics like bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site? When are you better off ignoring them? There are endless opinions on whether these kinds of metrics are valuable or not, and as you might suspect, the answer is found in the shades of grey. Learn what Rand has to say about the great metrics debate in today’s episode of Whiteboard Friday.

https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/sh1auopisi?seo=false&videoFoam=true

When bounce rate browse rate and ppc are useful metrics and when they suck

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re chatting about times at which bounce rate, browse rate, which is pages per visit, and time on site are terrible metrics and when they’re actually quite useful metrics.

This happens quite a bit. I see in the digital marketing world people talking about these metrics as though they are either dirty-scum, bottom-of-the-barrel metrics that no one should pay any attention to, or that they are these lofty, perfect metrics that are what we should be optimizing for. Neither of those is really accurate. As is often the case, the truth usually lies somewhere in between.

So, first off, some credit to Wil Reynolds, who brought this up during a discussion that I had with him at Siege Media’s offices, an interview that Ross Hudgens put together with us, and Sayf Sharif from Seer Interactive, their Director of Analytics, who left an awesome comment about this discussion on the LinkedIn post of that video. We’ll link to those in this Whiteboard Friday.

So Sayf and Wil were both basically arguing that these are kind of crap metrics. We don’t trust them. We don’t use them a lot. I think, a lot of the time, that makes sense.

Instances when these metrics aren’t useful

Here’s when these metrics, that bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site kind of suck.

1. When they’re used instead of conversion actions to represent “success”

So they suck when you use them instead of conversion actions. So a conversion is someone took an action that I wanted on my website. They filled in a form. They purchased a product. They put in their credit card. Whatever it is, they got to a page that I wanted them to get to.

Bounce rate is basically the average percent of people who landed on a page and then left your website, not to continue on any other page on that site after visiting that page.

Pages per visit is essentially exactly what it sounds like, the average number of pages per visit for people who landed on that particular page. So people who came in through one of these pages, how many pages did they visit on my site.

Then time on site is essentially a very raw and rough metric. If I leave my computer to use the restroom or I basically switch to another tab or close my browser, it’s not necessarily the case that time on site ends right then. So this metric has a lot of imperfections. Now, averaged over time, it can still be directionally interesting.

But when you use these instead of conversion actions, which is what we all should be optimizing for ultimately, you can definitely get into some suckage with these metrics.

2. When they’re compared against non-relevant “competitors” and other sites

When you compare them against non-relevant competitors, so when you compare, for example, a product-focused, purchase-focused site against a media-focused site, you’re going to get big differences. First off, if your pages per visit look like a media site’s pages per visit and you’re product-focused, that is crazy. Either the media site is terrible or you’re doing something absolutely amazing in terms of keeping people’s attention and energy.

Time on site is a little bit misleading in this case too, because if you look at the time on site, again, of a media property or a news-focused, content-focused site versus one that’s very e-commerce focused, you’re going to get vastly different things. Amazon probably wants your time on site to be pretty small. Dell wants your time on site to be pretty small. Get through the purchase process, find the computer you want, buy it, get out of here. If you’re taking 10 minutes to do that or 20 minutes to do that instead of 5, we’ve failed. We haven’t provided a good enough experience to get you quickly through the purchase funnel. That can certainly be the case. So there can be warring priorities inside even one of these metrics.

3. When they’re not considered over time or with traffic sources factored in

Third, you get some suckage when they are not considered over time or against the traffic sources that brought them in. For example, if someone visits a web page via a Twitter link, chances are really good, really, really good, especially on mobile, that they’re going to have a high bounce rate, a low number of pages per visit, and a low time on site. That’s just how Twitter behavior is. Facebook is quite similar.

Now, if they’ve come via a Google search, an informational Google search and they’ve clicked on an organic listing, you should see just the reverse. You should see a relatively good bounce rate. You should see a relatively good pages per visit, well, a relatively higher pages per visit, a relatively higher time on site.

Instances when these metrics are useful1. When they’re used as diagnostics for the conversion funnel

So there’s complexity inside these metrics for sure. What we should be using them for, when these metrics are truly useful is when they are used as a diagnostic. So when you look at a conversion funnel and you see, okay, our conversion funnel looks like this, people come in through the homepage or through our blog or news sections, they eventually, we hope, make it to our product page, our pricing page, and our conversion page.

We have these metrics for all of these. When we make changes to some of these, significant changes, minor changes, we don’t just look at how conversion performs. We also look at whether things like time on site shrank or whether people had fewer pages per visit or whether they had a higher bounce rate from some of these sections.

So perhaps, for example, we changed our pricing and we actually saw that people spent less time on the pricing page and had about the same number of pages per visit and about the same bounce rate from the pricing page. At the same time, we saw conversions dip a little bit.

Should we intuit that pricing negatively affected our conversion rate? Well, perhaps not. Perhaps we should look and see if there were other changes made or if our traffic sources were in there, because it looks like, given that bounce rate didn’t increase, given that pages per visit didn’t really change, given that time on site actually went down a little bit, it seems like people are making it just fine through the pricing page. They’re making it just fine from this pricing page to the conversion page, so let’s look at something else.

This is the type of diagnostics that you can do when you have metrics at these levels. If you’ve seen a dip in conversions or a rise, this is exactly the kind of dig into the data that smart, savvy digital marketers should and can be doing, and I think it’s a powerful, useful tool to be able to form hypotheses based on what happens.

So again, another example, did we change this product page? We saw pages per visit shrink and time on site shrink. Did it affect conversion rate? If it didn’t, but then we see that we’re getting fewer engaged visitors, and so now we can’t do as much retargeting and we’re losing email signups, maybe this did have a negative effect and we should go back to the other one, even if conversion rate itself didn’t seem to take a particular hit in this case.

2. When they’re compared over time to see if internal changes or external forces shifted behavior

Second useful way to apply these metrics is compared over time to see if your internal changes or some external forces shifted behavior. For example, we can look at the engagement rate on the blog. The blog is tough to generate as a conversion event. We could maybe look at subscriptions, but in general, pages per visit is a nice one for the blog. It tells us whether people make it past the page they landed on and into deeper sections, stick around our site, check out what we do.

So if we see that it had a dramatic fall down here in April and that was when we installed a new author and now they’re sort of recovering, we can say, “Oh, yeah, you know what? That takes a little while for a new blog author to kind of come up to speed. We’re going to give them time,” or, “Hey, we should interject here. We need to jump in and try and fix whatever is going on.”

3. When they’re benchmarked versus relevant industry competitors

Third and final useful case is when you benchmark versus truly relevant industry competitors. So if you have a direct competitor, very similar focus to you, product-focused in this case with a homepage and then some content sections and then a very focused product checkout, you could look at you versus them and their homepage and your homepage.

If you could get the data from a source like SimilarWeb or Jumpshot, if there’s enough clickstream level data, or some savvy industry surveys that collect this information, and you see that you’re significantly higher, you might then take a look at what are they doing that we’re not doing. Maybe we should use them when we do our user research and say, “Hey, what’s compelling to you about this that maybe is missing here?”

Otherwise, a lot of the time people will take direct competitors and say, “Hey, let’s look at what our competition is doing and we’ll consider that best practice.” But if you haven’t looked at how they’re performing, how people are getting through, whether they’re engaging, whether they’re spending time on that site, whether they’re making it through their different pages, you don’t know if they actually are best practices or whether you’re about to follow a laggard’s example and potentially hurt yourself.

So definitely a complex topic, definitely many, many different things that go into the uses of these metrics, and there are some bad and good ways to use them. I agree with Sayf and with Wil, but I think there are also some great ways to apply them. I would love to hear from you if you’ve got examples of those down in the comments. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Online Reputation Management: A Guide for Social Media Marketers

Wondering what people think about your business? Interested in using social media to improve your online reputation? In this article, you’ll learn how to research, manage, and protect your brand’s reputation with social media. Online Reputation Management and How It Impacts Your Business Your online reputation determines how others perceive your business when they search

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6 Facebook Advertising Mistakes Every Marketer Makes

6 Facebook Advertising Mistakes Every Marketer Makes

Facebook ads can take up a significant amount of a marketing budget. That might be okay if you’re getting good results, but too many marketers advertise on Facebook without methodical approaches. They then find themselves experiencing the same Facebook-related pitfalls.

1. Overlooking Video as a Marketing Method

Research from BuzzSumo indicates a decline in engagement with many types of posts. Facebook reports that up to 15,000 pieces of content could appear in a person’s feed each time they log onto Facebook. There’s more content being made than there is time to absorb it.

BuzzSumo reviewed a year’s worth of content and engagements on Facebook and found that although posts with images and links show a decline in interactions, that’s not true for video posts. In fact, there was a 10 percent increase in engagement over the past year with these types of posts.

Yet video posts are still nowhere near as prominent as other kinds of content on Facebook. Marketers have an opportunity to fill the void and gain traction by creating video-based ads.

There’s more content posted to Facebook than there is time to absorb it.
Click To Tweet
2. Not Being Specific Enough With Targeting

Some U.S.-based Facebook advertising campaigns target 20 million people. It’s not surprising that a significant number of the people who see those ads don’t respond favorably—or at all. Marketers should be realistic when determining the number of people to target with their product, service, or brand.

Facebook’s advertising interface can also give suggestions about the potential number of people reached by a particular amount of ad spending. If the audience is too large, it’s better to narrow it down by targeting age ranges, geographic areas, or genders.

15000 pieces of content

3. Failing to Consistently Monitor Ads

Monitoring is necessary for a campaign’s success, and it’s easy with Facebook’s handy automation tools. However, it can be tempting for marketers to rely on them too heavily. Look to your target audience’s comments on Facebook ads for an accurate gauge of whether a campaign is resonating with them or annoying them. It’s also essential to avoid targeting the same people with the same content again and again—an effective way to frustrate an audience.

4. Choosing the Wrong Type of Ad for the Intended Action

Facebook offers various types of ads, and that’s sometimes problematic. A marketing professional could make the common mistake of picking an ad type without making sure it’s the most appropriate type for the desired response. There are many advertising options to choose from, including ads meant to boost attendance at events, bring people to a website, and urge them to install an app. Becoming familiar with each type and its purpose helps reduce the likelihood of selecting an add that won’t connect with your audience.

5. Testing Too Many Things at Once

Test different kinds of Facebook ads with your desired audience, especially ads with images. That said, testing should happen carefully and include adequate isolation to learn which characteristics of ads have the highest impact on viewers.

Another frequent Facebook advertising mistake is not isolating one variable to test. If you fail to isolate your ad variables, you’ll find it difficult (or even impossible) to know with any certainty which factor inspired a more positive reaction than usual.

6. Making Decisions About Future Advertising Plans Too Hastily

Marketers often assume there won’t be any major changes in audience perceptions of a brand or societal opinions of an advertising platform before a campaign ends. They plan their advertising campaigns too far in advance, which could lead to problems. When the third-party company Cambridge Analytica gained access to Facebook data from millions of people without consent, many users and brands second-guessed using or advertising on Facebook. The news affected the advertising strategies of Sonos and Mozilla, among others, as brands decided to reevaluate whether they’d continue using Facebook to reach customers moving forward.

Changing Perceptions

A recent Reuters/Ipsos poll found only 41 percent of respondents trust Facebook with their data. Perhaps the brands that have already stopped advertising on Facebook view their decision as a proactive one and think Facebook will fall out of fashion soon.

Other brands, however, were not compelled to take immediate action. Company representatives pointed out that Facebook is not the only company that collects data about users. Facebook’s current predicament, they believe, could have happened to any other social media giant.

Most marketers feel that for now, there are more good reasons to keep advertising on Facebook than to jump ship. The lesson learned here is that unforeseen events can threaten the perceived stability and effectiveness of any advertising campaign.

41 percent of Americans

Think Strategically

As a marketer, it’s smart to be as flexible as possible while also resisting the urge to make drastic moves. Crafting individual Facebook campaigns is no different. Advertisers frequently pull the plug on campaigns that don’t get immediate, positive results. Having patience often results in larger than expected payoffs.

It’s not surprising that brands continue to devote substantial marketing budget to Facebook ads. By keeping these common missteps in mind, you can increase your chances of publishing maximally effective content.

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Facebook Features!

Facebook Features!

Every time I log into my Facebook page or profile I always find a new feature that pops up or one that I have become familiar with disappear.

It can be overwhelming for the business owner to keep up to date with the constant changes with this amazing social media platform. To remove some of that stress I have outlined a few of the new features that Facebook is now offering, you may be aware of them or you may not.

The first of many features is the ability to organise our newsfeed and contacts. If you use your personal profile as a marketing tool (accept all friend requests) you may wish to sort out the friends, family members, colleagues and networking connections, even those people that you haven’t met as yet.

1. Organise Your List

Open up your home news feed and under the explore tab on the left-hand side you will see friends list.

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Where Your Brand is Going Wrong With Paid Social


Like paid search before it, paid social has become a hotspot of competition within the digital marketing world. More and more, people are looking to it to diversify their ad spending. It’s an arena rich with opportunity, but also with plenty of room for error.

We all know that the only constant with social platforms is change; you simply cannot build your brand effectively via paid social advertising if you’re not continuously examining, learning, and refining your approach. Pattern89’s recent webinar on the Anatomy of A Social Ad is full of gems about how to do just that.

Pattern89 has created an impressive data co-op consisting of information from hundreds of top brands that use a cutting-edge machine learning platform to analyze and predict ad performance. It looks at over 2,400 attributes of an ad, from the creative itself to audience targeting, audience saturation, and more.

Their ultimate goal is not just to answer WHAT is happening, but WHY it’s happening. This webinar is based on the data gleaned from studying the co-op’s Facebook and Instagram paid social advertisements in 2017.

The Full Funnel

Conversion is the name of the game, right? Everyone’s boss wants to see the hard numbers on how many purchases were made in response to a particular ad buy. But you might be missing the forest for the trees if you assume that’s the only way to approach paid social.

Looking at ads by objective, 72% of the ads in Pattern89’s data set from 2017 were focused on conversion. Only 10% were focused on awareness and a mere 17% have a goal of consideration. The imbalance is striking.

In order to secure and maintain conversion rates, you must also focus on building awareness and consideration into your sales funnel. Doing so will drive traffic and engagement that will help you retarget and convert users throughout the buying cycle, giving you an exponentially stronger return on your ad spend!

In order to secure and maintain conversion rates, you must also focus on building awareness and consideration into your sales funnel.
Click To Tweet

And there are opportunities for capitalizing on paid social through the funnel. The key is to make sure the ads you’re serving up are finding the right audience at the right time, whether they’re just thinking about buying, shopping for options, or are ready to pull the trigger.

Get Creative!

Looking at 2017 ad trends, Pattern89 confirmed that the strongest common factor amongst top advertisers—that is, those who are getting the highest return on their ad spend—is that they are testing FIVE TIMES the creative of the average account.

If you want to take your brand to the next level, testing and honing your creative approach is a surefire way to do that. There are four major areas of creative focus they identified that are ripe for the picking in 2018:

1. Video 🎥

I know, I know. It’s been said approximately two million times: video is the future. Every single source (from media to the social platforms themselves) report that video is consistently outperforming every other type of content on social channels. And yet, there is still a massive gap between what is and what should be. Image is still the dominant format for pretty much every marketer.

It can feel nerve-wracking to make the investment and navigate the challenges of fitting video into your ad program, but the competition is so slim that there exists practically endless opportunity! On Facebook in 2017, 93.4% of posts were image-based, versus just 6.6% video-based. On Instagram, that same number is 91.5% to 8.5%. Get in while the getting’s good!

2. Emojis 🤪

It may seem silly, but it’s true: according to Pattern89’s co-op data, ads with emojis universally perform better than those without. Looking at ads with conversion as their main objective, there was a significant difference on the return for ad spend for those ads featuring emojis: Facebook showed a 9 to 1 vs. 7 to 1 ratio and Instagram came in at 8 to 1 vs. 6 to 1.

What was the most popular emoji of 2017? Coffee! Followed closely by the surprise face and the sunglasses face. They recommend experimenting with emojis that feel natural and organic to your brand to see what, if anything, strikes a chord with your audience.

3. The Right CTA ✔️

A few little words can make a world of difference! For example, co-op data showed the difference between using the phrases “Shop Now” and “Learn More” for conversion objectives to have a major effect on return for ad spend.

On Facebook, “Shop Now” came in at 15 to1 vs. 6 to 1 for “Learn More” and on Instagram, those same numbers were 11.4 to 1 to 5.6 to 1. So think about what kind of call to action you’re using and play around with phrasing to ensure that you’re optimizing each and every paid social ad for top-notch performance.

4. Sentiment 😂

This may not be something you’ve considered before, because as marketers we always want to approach ad creation with an enthusiastically positive perspective on our product or brand. But the data shows that it’s actually a neutral sentiment that is smashing the competition (both positive and negative) in paid social ads, regardless of whether the ultimate objective of the ad is awareness, consideration, or conversion.

At every level of the funnel, it seems that consumers are responding most to those messages that simply give them information in a way that allows them the freedom to form their own positive or negative sentiment, rather than those which are overtly positive (or negative). Experimenting with a more neutral tone may be a key to boosting your engagement.

This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how you can use social ad data to analyze your brand’s performance and rework your ad program for optimal success. To learn more about maximizing your paid social advertising at every level of the funnel, check out Pattern89’s new webinar. You can also request a demo to see how their bulletproof process and unique blend of human and artificial intelligence can help take your brand to the next level.

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