Hughes Superior Pressure Washing Houston Texas

Hughes Superior Pressure Washing Houston Texas
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Facebook Live Screen Sharing, Facebook VR Updates, and New Facebook Ad Options

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show with Michael Stelzner, we explore Facebook Live screen sharing and Facebook VR updates with Joel Comm, New Facebook ad

This post Facebook Live Screen Sharing, Facebook VR Updates, and New Facebook Ad Options first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

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How Links in Headers, Footers, Content, and Navigation Can Impact SEO – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

Which link is more valuable: the one in your nav, or the one in the content of your page? Now, how about if one of those in-content links is an image, and one is text? Not all links are created equal, and getting familiar with the details will help you build a stronger linking structure.

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How Links in Headers, Footers, Content, and Navigation Can Impact SEO

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

http://ift.tt/2yVZuNoVideo Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about links in headers and footers, in navigation versus content, and how that can affect both internal and external links and the link equity and link value that they pass to your website or to another website if you’re linking out to them.

So I’m going to use Candy Japan here. They recently crossed $1 million in sales. Very proud of Candy Japan. They sell these nice boxes of random assortments of Japanese candy that come to your house. Their website is actually remarkably simplistic. They have some footer links. They have some links in the content, but not a whole lot else. But I’m going to imagine them with a few more links in here just for our purposes.

It turns out that there are a number of interesting items when it comes to internal linking. So, for example, some on-page links matter more and carry more weight than other kinds. If you are smart and use these across your entire site, you can get some incremental or potentially some significant benefits depending on how you do it.

Do some on-page links matter more than others?

So, first off, good to know that…

I. Content links tend to matter more

…just broadly speaking, than navigation links. That shouldn’t be too surprising, right? If I have a link down here in the content of the page pointing to my Choco Puffs or my Gummies page, that might actually carry more weight in Google’s eyes than if I point to it in my navigation.

Now, this is not universally true, but observably, it seems to be the case. So when something is in the navigation, it’s almost always universally in that navigation. When something is in here, it’s often only specifically in here. So a little tough to tell cause and effect, but we can definitely see this when we get to external links. I’ll talk about that in a sec.

II. Links in footers often get devalued

So if there’s a link that you’ve got in your footer, but you don’t have it in your primary navigation, whether that’s on the side or the top, or in the content of the page, a link down here may not carry as much weight internally. In fact, sometimes it seems to carry almost no weight whatsoever other than just the indexing.

III. More used links may carry more weight

This is a theory for now. But we’ve seen some papers on this, and there has been some hypothesizing in the SEO community that essentially Google is watching as people browse the web, and they can get that data and sort of see that, hey, this is a well-trafficked page. It gets a lot of visits from this other page. This navigation actually seems to get used versus this other navigation, which doesn’t seem to be used.

There are a lot of ways that Google might interpret that data or might collect it. It could be from the size of it or the CSS qualities. It could be from how it appears on the page visually. But regardless, that also seems to be the case.

IV. Most visible links may get more weight

This does seem to be something that’s testable. So if you have very small fonts, very tiny links, they are not nearly as accessible or obvious to visitors. It seems to be the case that they also don’t carry as much weight in Google’s rankings.

V. On pages with multiple links to the same URL

For example, let’s say I’ve got this products link up here at the top, but I also link to my products down here under Other Candies, etc. It turns out that Google will see both links. They both point to the same page in this case, both pointing to the same page over here, but this page will only inherit the value of the anchor text from the first link on the page, not both of them.

So Other Candies, etc., that anchor text will essentially be treated as though it doesn’t exist. Google ignores multiple links to the same URL. This is actually true internal and external. For this reason, if you’re going ahead and trying to stuff in links in your internal content to other pages, thinking that you can get better anchor text value, well look, if they’re already in your navigation, you’re not getting any additional value. Same case if they’re up higher in the content. The second link to them is not carrying the anchor text value.

Can link location/type affect external link impact?

Other items to note on the external side of things and where they’re placed on pages.

I. In-content links are going to be more valuable than footers or nav links

In general, nav links are going to do better than footers. But in content, this primary content area right in here, that is where you’re going to get the most link value if you have the option of where you’re going to get an external link from on a page.

II. What if you have links that open in a new tab or in a new window versus links that open in the same tab, same window?

It doesn’t seem to matter at all. Google does not appear to carry any different weight from the experiments that we’ve seen and the ones we’ve conducted.

III. Text links do seem to perform better, get more weight than image links with alt attributes

They also seem to perform better than JavaScript links and other types of links, but critically important to know this, because many times what you will see is that a website will do something like this. They’ll have an image. This image will be a link that will point off to a page, and then below it they’ll have some sort of caption with keyword-rich anchors down here, and that will also point off. But Google will treat this first link as though it is the one, and it will be the alt attribute of this image that passes the anchor text, unless this is all one href tag, in which case you do get the benefit of the caption as the anchor. So best practice there.

IV. Multiple links from same page — only the first anchor counts

Well, just like with internal links, only the first anchor is going to count. So if I have two links from Candy Japan pointing to me, it’s only the top one that Google sees first in the HTML. So it’s not where it’s organized in the site as it renders visually, but where it comes up in the HTML of the page as Google is rendering that.

V. The same link and anchor on many or most or all pages on a website tends to get you into trouble.

Not always, not universally. Sometimes it can be okay. Is Amazon allowed to link to Whole Foods from their footer? Yes, they are. They’re part of the same company and group and that kind of thing. But if, for example, Amazon were to go crazy spamming and decided to make it “cheap avocados delivered to your home” and put that in the footer of all their pages and point that to the http://ift.tt/2yViyvr page, that would probably get penalized, or it may just be devalued. It might not rank at all, or it might not pass any link equity. So notable that in the cases where you have the option of, “Should I get a link on every page of a website? Well, gosh, that sounds like a good deal. I’d pass all this page rank and all this link equity.” No, bad deal.

Instead, far better would be to get a link from a page that’s already linked to by all of these pages, like, hey, if we can get a link from the About page or from the Products page or from the homepage, a link on the homepage, those are all great places to get links. I don’t want a link on every page in the footer or on every page in a sidebar. That tends to get me in trouble, especially if it is anchor text-rich and clearly keyword targeted and trying to manipulate SEO.

All right, everyone. I look forward to your questions. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Recommended Marketing Podcasts: Week of October 16th

This Weeks Recommended Marketing Podcasts Oct 20

Podcasts are a great way to educate yourself. Whether you’re on the train, in the car, at your desk, or anywhere in between, this medium is an incredible vehicle for supplementing your industry knowledge. Every two weeks, I’ll be sharing with you a round-up of some of the best marketing podcast episodes you can find, spanning the entirety of the marketing landscape. Whether you’re new to podcasts or a seasoned listener, I know you’ll find value in each weekly round-up. Let’s get listening, shall we?

Social Media Marketing PodcastSocial Media Marketing Podcast: Creating Short, Snackable Videos for Instagram and Beyond

Michael Stelzner, founder of Social Media Examiner, runs one of the most consistently useful podcasts around. In this episode, Michael interviews Lindsay Ostrom, founder of PinchofYum.com and author of the Tasty Food Photography ebook, on the topic of short video creation for Instagram and other social sites. Her success stems not only from putting in years of work with her core audience and sharing portions of her own life but also through finding the secret sauce that is creating short-form, fast-moving video.

Takeaway: Video is not going anywhere, and attention spans aren’t expanding. Understand where your audience wants to “eat,” and optimize content for those channels. As Lindsay shares, she knows her audience is most likely to engage and take action on Instagram, while YouTube is not her bread and butter. You might not have a team to help you create these videos, but fortunately, as Michael shares early in the episode, there are tools available that can make video creation easier. Continue to test different styles of video and text-on-image options until you find the perfect recipe for your own success (Wow, there are a lot of food metaphors here!).

Understand where your audience wants to ‘eat,’ and optimize content for those channels.
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This Old MarketingThis Old Marketing with Pulizzi & Rose PNR 203: Google and Amazon Prepare for Internet War

Anything that Google and Amazon do is big news. Anything that directly involves the two of them is massive. Google will no longer allow YouTube to be part of Amazon’s Echo Show, their new Alexa tablet, and there will definitely be some interesting changes on the horizon because of it. Outside of this power struggle, Robert Rose and Joe Pulizzi of The Content Marketing Institute discuss Twitter experimentation with 280 characters and some of the habits we can learn from the top content marketers in the industry.

Takeaways: It’s common to see the big boys play not-so-nice with each other, especially when it comes to new markets like the Smart Home space. As a marketer, moves like this make our jobs much harder, while also creating new opportunities. It creates additional wrinkles to sift through when determining where we need to invest our time and budgets. Whenever tech giants don’t want to cooperate, everyone else pays the price. Ultimately, it’s about finding and servicing our audiences where they want to be reached.

Masters of ScaleMasters of Scale Episode 4: Imperfect Is Perfect

Any episode of The Masters of Scale podcast is worth a listen, considering LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman is the host of the show. Add in Facebook’s founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and you have yourself an episode for the ages. In this episode, we learn about Mark’s beginnings as a young developer and how he practiced being “imperfect.” It’s a philosophy he shares and preaches to all of Facebook’s employees, and one any Facebook user knows well—just think about the last time a new feature was introduced that left you and your friends saying, “This is stupid!”

Takeaways: Much like Nike’s famous slogan says, just do it, whatever that it may be. If you have an idea for a product or service, it’s better to go forward with it in a bare-bones (functioning) state than it is to let it simmer until it’s too late. While it might be hard for some of us (like myself) to accept something less than perfect from ourselves at the start, we’ll be better for it in the long-term if we get to work and push our ideas into the world.

That’s all for this edition! I’ll be back with a new batch next week. In the meantime, share any podcasts you think I should know about in the comments!

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The Journey: Episode 2

The Journey, a Social Media Examiner production, is an episodic video documentary that shows you what really happens inside a growing business. //www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjIMZHCvPQw Watch The Journey: Episode 2 Episode 2 of The Journey reveals pressures faced by Michael Stelzner (founder of Social Media Examiner) as he mobilizes his team to achieve a difficult objective. Mike

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– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

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Chatbots: Marketing Automation via Messenger

Wondering how chatbots can improve open and click-through rates on Facebook? Want to build funnels into your chatbot messaging? To explore how to develop marketing messaging that works in Facebook Messenger chatbots, I interview Andrew Warner. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner.

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– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

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Unlocking Hidden Gems Within Schema.org

Posted by alexis-sanders

Schema.org is cryptic. Or at least that’s what I had always thought. To me, it was a confusing source of information: missing the examples I needed, not explaining which item properties search engines require, and overall making the process of implementing structured data a daunting task. However, once I got past Schema.org’s intimidating shell, I found an incredibly useful and empowering tool. Once you know how to leverage it, Schema.org is an indispensable tool within your SEO toolbox.

A structured data toolbox

The first part of any journey is finding the map. In terms of structured data, there are a few different guiding resources:

  • The most prominent and useful are Google’s Structured Data Features Guides. These guides are organized by the different structured data markups Google is explicitly using. Useful examples are provided with required item properties.

    Tip: If any of the item types listed in the feature guides are relevant to your site, ensure that you’re annotating these elements.

  • I also want to share Merkle’s new, free, supercalifragilisticexpialidocious Structured Data Markup Generator. It contains Google’s top markups with an incredibly user-friendly experience and all of the top item properties. This tool is a great support for starting your markups, and it’s great for individuals looking to reverse-engineer markups. It offers JSON-LD and some illustrative microdata markups. You can also send the generated markups directly to Google’s structured data testing tool.

  • If you’re looking to go beyond Google’s recommendations and structure more data, check out Schema.org’s Full Hierarchy. This is a full list of all Schema.org’s core and extended vocabulary (i.e., a list of all item types). This page is very useful to determine additional opportunities for markup that may align with your structured data strategy.

    Tip: Click “Core plus all extensions” to see extended Schema.org’s libraries and what’s in the pipeline.

  • Last but not least is Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool. It is vital to check every markup with GSDTT for two reasons:
    • To avoid silly syntactic mistakes (don’t let commas be your worst enemy — there are way better enemies out there ☺).
    • Ensure all required item properties are included

As an example, I’m going to walk through the Aquarium item type Schema.org markup. For illustrative purposes, I’m going to stick with JSON-LD moving forward; however, if there are any microdata questions, please reach out in the comments.

Basic structure of all Schema.org pages

When you first enter a Schema.org item type’s page, notice that every page has the same layout, starting with the item type name, the canonical reference URL (currently the HTTP version*), where the markup lives within the Schema.org hierarchy, and that item type’s usage on the web.

*Leveraging the HTTPS version of a Schema.org markup is acceptable

What is an item type?

An item type is a piece of Schema.org’s vocabulary of data used to annotate and structure elements on a web page. You can think about it as what you’re marking up.

At the highest level of most Schema.org item types is Thing (alternatively, we’d be looking at DataType). This intuitively makes sense because almost everything is, at its highest level of abstraction, a Thing. The item type Thing has multiple children, all of which assume Thing’s properties in a cascading in a hierarchical fashion (i.e., a Product is a Thing, both can have names, descriptions, and images).

Explore Schema.org’s item types here with the various visualizations:

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Item types are going to be the first attribute in your markup and will look a little like this (remember this for a little later):

Tip: Every Schema.org item type can be found by typing its name after Schema.org, i.e. http://ift.tt/29ncxrU (note that case is important).

Below, this is where things start to get fun — the properties, expected type, and description of each property.

What are item properties?

Item properties are attributes, which describe item types (i.e., it’s a property of the item). All item properties are inherited from the parent item type. The value of the property can be a word, URL, or number.

What is the “Expected Type”?

For every item type, there is a column the defines the expected item type of each item property. This is a signal which tells us whether or not nesting will be involved. If the expected property is a data type (i.e., text, number, etc.) you will not have to do anything; otherwise get ready for some good, old-fashioned nesting.

One of the things you may have noticed: under “Property” it says “Properties from CivicStructure.” We know that an Aquarium is a child of CivicStructure, as it is listed above. If we scan the page, we see the following “Properties from…”:

This looks strikingly like the hierarchy listed above and it is (just vertical… and backward). Only one thing is missing – where are the “Properties from Aquarium”?

The answer is actually quite simple — Aquarium has no item properties of its own. Therefore, CivilStructures (being the next most specific item type with properties) is listed first.

Structuring this information with more specific properties at the top makes a ton of sense intuitively. When marking up information, we are typically interested in the most specific item properties, ones that are closest conceptually to the thing we’re marking up. These properties are generally the most relevant.

Creating a markup

  1. Open the Schema.org item type page.
  2. Review all item properties and select all relevant attributes.
    • After looking at the documentation, openingHours, address, aggregateRating, telephone, alternateName, description, image, name, and sameAs (social media linking item property) stood out as the most cogent and useful for aquarium goers. In an effort to map out all of the information, I added the “Expected Type” (which will be important in the next step) and the value of the information we’re going to markup.
  3. Add the starting elements of all markup.
    • All markup, whether JSON-LD or microdata, starts with the same set of code/markup. One can memorize this code or leverage examples and copy/paste.
    • JSON-LD: Add the script tag with the JSON-LD type, along with the @context, and @type with the item type included:
  4. Start light. Add the easier item properties (i.e., the ones that don’t require nesting).
    • First off, how do you tell whether or not the property nests?
      • This is where the “Expected Type” column comes into play.
      • If the “Expected Type” is “Text”, “URL”, or “Number” — you don’t need to nest.
    • I’ve highlighted the item properties that do not require nesting above in green. We’ll start by adding these to our markup.
  • JSON-LD: Contains the item property in quotation marks, along with the value (text and URLs are always in quotation marks). If there are multiple values, they’re listed as arrays within square [brackets].

  • Finish strong. Add the nested item properties.
    • Nested item properties are item types within item types. Through nesting, we can access the properties of the nested item type.
    • JSON-LD: Nested item properties start off like normal item properties; however, things get weird after the colon. A curly brace opens up a new world. We start by declaring a new item type and thus, inside these curly braces all item properties now belong to the new item type. Note how commas are not included after the last property.
  • Test in Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool.
    • Looks like we’re all good to go, with no errors and no warnings.
  • Side notes:

    • *address: Google’s documentation list address, nested within PostAddress as a requirement. This is a good indicator of why it’s important to review Google’s documentation.
    • openingHours: Multiple times are listed out in an array (as indicated by the square brackets). As the documentation’s “Description section” mentions – using a hyphen for ranges and military time.
      • Note: Google’s documentation uses the openingHoursSpecification item property, which nests OpeningHoursSpecification. This is a good example where Google documentation shows a more specific experience to consider.
    • telephone: Sometimes you need to add a country code (+1) for phone numbers.
    • image: URLs must be absolute (i.e., protocol and domain name included).

    TL;DR:

    • Schema.org’s documentation can be leveraged to supplement Google’s structured data documentation
    • The “Expected Type” on Schema.org tells you when you need to nest an item type
    • Check out Merkle’s Structured Data Markup Generator if you want to try simply inserting values and getting a preliminary markup

    Thanks!

    A huge thanks to Max Prin (@maxxeight), Adam Audette (@audette), and the @MerkleCRM team for reviewing this article. Plus, shout outs to Max (again), Steve Valenza (#TwitterlessSteve), and Eric Hammond (@elhammond) for their work, ideas, and thought leadership that went into the Schema Generator Tool!

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    4 Ways to Fix Your Broken Content Marketing

    4 Ways to Fix Your Broken Content Marketing

    The myth of content marketing runs deep.

    We still think that if we build it, they will come. But it’s been proven time and time again that this strategy doesn’t work. It’s time to fix that.

    My team at Convince & Convert and I today are releasing a new ebook:

    4 Ways to Fix Your Broken Content Marketing

    4 Ways to Fix Your Broken Content Marketing: The Thoughtful Marketer’s Guide

    This ebook isn’t a magic bullet for making your content marketing work. That doesn’t exist, unfortunately. What we do instead is take you through a step-by-step guide on how to define a data-driven content strategy that reaches your audience with relevant, timely, and useful content.

    Once you’ve got that dialed in, we show you how to think beyond the blog and into more exciting content types that you can experiment with depending on your specific goals and outcomes.

    Ultimately, I want you to have a clear framework for what to publish, when, and how so that your content marketing efforts will actually do something for your business, not just sit on your site growing mold. This way, you’ll involve the right people, tools, and resources to make meaningful connections.

    Enjoy!

    Provide your name and email address, and you’ll get instant access to the ebook when you confirm subscription via email. The download will start right away, so be sure to check your downloads folder or wherever your file downloads normally land.

    The 4 Fixes

    The ebook has 55 slides and is divided into four sections, one for each of the big fixes you need to get your content marketing on track.

    Fix Your Content Topics: Is what you’re creating relevant enough?

    Fix Your Content Formats: Are you making content in the modes your audience prefers?

    Fix Your Content Creators: How often are real people creating your content?

    Fix Your Content Amplification: How does anyone know your content marketing exists?

    I know you’re going to love this ebook. The content atomization cheat sheet alone (pages 29–32) is super detailed by itself. Please give it a look, and leave your comments below.

    Thanks as always!

    Download 4 Ways to Fix Your Broken Content Marketing:

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    How to Boost Blog Traffic and Brand Awareness Through Influencer Marketing

    How to Boost Blog Traffic and Brand Awareness Through Influencer Marketing

    Having a blog is necessary for most businesses. If you look at companies like Google, Starbucks, and Virgin, no matter how big they already are, they still care enough to have business blogs.

    Blogging lets you build trust in your brand when you deliver quality content to your audience. You can respond to your customers’ concerns with a thoughtful blog post. It also gives you a platform to attract leads in a helpful and not salesy way.

    But if you’re a smaller business on a budget, how can you get more traffic and conversions to your blog?

    Enter influencer marketing.

    Influencer marketing is one of the most cost-effective ways to build traffic for your blog. In fact, it’s fast becoming the go-to marketing strategy for both big and small brands. Stats show that 94% of the marketers who have employed an influencer marketing strategy believe the technique to be effective.

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    LinkedIn Website Demographics: What Marketers Need to Know

    Want more information on people who visit your website? Did you know LinkedIn can help? LinkedIn Website Demographics provides professional insights about your website visitors and allows you to remarket to them through LinkedIn ads. In this article, you’ll learn how to set up and use LinkedIn’s Website Demographics for remarketing. #1: Set Up LinkedIn

    This post LinkedIn Website Demographics: What Marketers Need to Know first appeared on .
    – Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

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